Tag Archives: southern fried tofu

CSA #6, the Best 80’s Movie to Feature Nuns and Dance Competitions, and Putting Gravy on Your Veggies

I spend most of June not believing it’s finally summer, so July is when the feeling really sets in. That can be a good thing and a bad thing. While I love warm weather activities, I tend to get more lethargic as the season makes its steady stretch to the end of August. Maybe it’s the heat or the sunshine or the overall slower pace of things, but I just don’t get very much done this time of year. Summertime is just about the best time to make excuses for inactivity.

That’s my half-assed excuse for not being especially prolific with blogging these days. My other, more reasonable excuse is that I am moving, therefore any extra time that isn’t spent packing is time that I feel like I’m wasting. Which is never really true when that time is put toward something I love, like blogging, but is definitely true when that time is put toward something like watching Girls Just Want to Have Fun on Encore.

Wow, the Dog Days really have me so lazy and distracted that I’m filling out a post with a movie trailer when I’m supposed to be focusing on our nutritious and body-enriching weekly CSA. Which is a shame considering out great our yield was (again) this week.

Kale and carrots

Radishes, sweet peppers, garlic, onion

Summer squash and potatoes.

I’ve taken to including a recipe at the end of these posts, showcasing just how we’re incorporating the CSA into our meals. This weekend, however, we didn’t do anything particularly fancy with what we used. We just made our favorites that much better with the addition of farm-fresh produce.

Better tasting, that is. Not necessarily better for our health. Observe Saturday night’s feast:


Yes, that is gravy smothering the corn, the potatoes, and the Southern-fried tofu. You might remember the tofu and gravy from a prior post. The corn is, admittedly, canned corn, drained and seasoned with salt, pepper, and vegan margarine. The mashed potatoes are a mix of the yellow and purple potatoes that came to us in our CSA and two Russet potatoes I purchased at People’s down the street.

The only gravy-less item on the plate is the slow-cooked kale, which will serve as my humble half-assed recipe for today. This method works equally well for collard greens, as well as broccoli and cauliflower.

[On a side note, take a look sometime at the beneficial elements of kale. Thanks to its high levels of antioxidants, beta carotene, Vitamin K, Vitamin C, and carotenoids, it’s a nutritional powerhouse and damn tasty to boot. It’s also fairly easy to grow, so if anyone is thinking of starting a garden or adding to their bounty, it’s a good crop to consider.]

Slow-Cooked Summer Kale

Ingredients
– 1 lb (or so) fresh kale, rinsed and dried
– 1 tbsp vegetable oil
– 1/2 cup vegetable stock
– 1 tbsp tabasco
– 1 tsp red pepper flakes
– Salt and pepper to taste

– In a large pot, heat the oil, stock, and tabasco. Add the kale (you can keep it on the stalk if you plan to cook it for a long time, or tear off the leaves if you’re only planning to cook it for an hour or so), red pepper flakes, salt and pepper. Stir until all the leaves are well coated, then cover and allow to simmer on low heat for up to four hours.

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Good Morning, Southern Fried Tofu with Biscuits and Gravy

So, if the concept of Meatless Mondays are to cut down on overall meat-consumption by dedicating one day to meatlessness, then I am right there with it. Much of my week is dedicated to meatlessness, in fact. But if the concept of Meatless Mondays are to invent and prepare meals that are meatless and healthier than we may normally eat… well, I may have missed the mark.

Vegan soul food exists. Anyone who tells you differently has never been down to the freaky little college towns of the South, like Athens, GA, where soul food and vegan cuisine commingle in ecstatic proportions. Then there are terrific vegan cookbooks like Alicia Simpson’s Quick and Easy Vegan Comfort Food, a book that while not strictly soul food-oriented, has more than a majority’s share of veganized Southern dishes. I have tried many of them (including a take on her pasta salad recipe) and they have all satisfied that soul food craving while being delightfully animal-free.

Today’s recipe does not come from Simpson’s cookbook. It’s a blending of a variation of recipes from different sources, VegWeb, a biscuit recipe in La Dolce Vegan, and some of my own kitchen noodling. It’s not heart-healthy, really, but it’s damn tasty. I make when I need a soul food fix, when I need something special, or when I want to make my partner smile.

Southern Fried Tofu with Biscuits and Gravy

Tofu and Gravy Ingredients
– 1 pound extra firm tofu, pressed and cut into eight equal sized slices
– 1 cup all purpose flour
– 1 tsp baking powder
– 2 tbsp nutritional yeast (optional, but recommended)
– 2 tsp poultry seasoning
– 1 tsp cayenne pepper (or more if you like it spicy)
– Pinch black pepper
– 1/2 tsp onion powder
– 8 ounces soft silken tofu
– 1/2 cup unsweetened non-dairy milk
– Oil
– 2 cups unsweetened non-dairy milk (for gravy)

– Mix together the flour, baking powder, and seasonings and set aside. Mix together the silken tofu and 1/2 cup “milk” in large, shallow bowl.

– To prepare the tofu slices: Dip each slice first in the flour mixture, then coat in the silken tofu mixture, then coat in the flour once more. Fry each slice until both sides are golden brown.

– To prepare the gravy: Save at least two tablespoons of the cooking oil. Add two to three tablespoons of the leftover flour/seasoning mixture and stir in up to 2 cups “milk” (more if you like it thinner, less if you want thicker). Keep stirring until gravy is thickened.

Biscuit Ingredients
– 2 cups flour
– 3 tsp baking powder
– 3/4 tsp salt
– 1/4 cup vegan margarine
– 3/4 cup “milk”
– 1 tsp apple cider vinegar

– Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Stir together the flour, baking powder, salt. Stir in the vegan margarine, “milk,” and vinegar until well blended. Knead dough for about a minute, roll out dough on a lightly floured surface, and cut out biscuits using a biscuit cutter, cookie cutter, or do what I do: Lightly flour the edge of a glass and use that to cut out the biscuits.

– Bake the biscuits on a lightly greased sheet for 12 to 15 minutes.

(Recipes adapted from this recipe on VegWeb and “Basic Baking Powder Biscuits” from La Dolce Vegan by Sarah Kramer)