Tag Archives: shrimp

Silky’s Crow’s Nest


A while back, I worked as a front desk clerk for a hotel and restaurant in the area. Because we had no formal concierge, the front desk was expected to manage visitor requests and questions, among the most popular being, “Where should we go to get dinner?” Many times, this question would be coupled with additional criteria: “Where should we go to get dinner on the riverfront?”

To that question, there isn’t an easy answer. While we have many restaurants on the river, so where can you go is not an issue. Where should you go… well, that’s an entirely different story.

Like any waterfront real estate, properties by the riverside are highly sought after. The ability to dine while overlooking a body of water will never go out of favor – just ask the fine folks of some of the most mediocre restaurants lining our East Coast beaches. It really doesn’t seem to matter to most waterfront restaurants whether their food is of decent quality, their staff well trained, efficient, and friendly, or even their interior atmosphere welcoming. The whole sell is that they’re on the water, which puts their diners that much closer to the water, and that setting in of itself is enough to get people through the door.

There are exceptions, of course. And then there are places like Silky’s Crow’s Nest, which is neither the exception nor the rule waterfront dining, but instead inhabits a limbo between above-par dining and sub-par riverside stride. But, as with many places of its type, the bar and restaurant requires the diner to set their expectations realistically. When reaching for a menu item just a bit above ordinary, the chances of their kitchen turning out something splendid is fairly slim.

Silky's Crows Nest on Urbanspoon

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Moonlite Cafe


It’s fair enough to say “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” but there are a lot of sound reasons people judge restaurants by the look of their exterior. These reasons tend to apply more to contemporary restaurants opened in the last ten years or so. For establishments residing in the same place for decade after decade, worn exteriors often mislead as shabby, rundown, or divey. Even if one of these traits does apply, it doesn’t necessarily indicate a poor dining experience. You just have to have the right expectations.

The Moonlite Cafe in Brookline is a good example of having an expectation based on an exterior appearance completely surpassed by the performance of the restaurant within. Assuming you didn’t carefully read the green awning over the main entrance, it’s more than likely you’d assume this was just your standard old dive bar in a neighborhood full of them. And you wouldn’t be totally wrong – the lounge leading into the back dining room is fairly divey. But the dining room is something else altogether. Continue reading