Tag Archives: potato

CSA #5: Greens’n’Beans!

It’s been a rough week. Other than my brief trip to Jose & Tony’s on Monday, eating-wise it’s been a week of scraps, leftovers, and retreads. It hasn’t all been bad, of course – burnt out by Wednesday, I took my partner to Thai Cuisine, where yellow curry with mock duck soothed my weary soul – but until the weekend, I hadn’t really had a chance to relax, to spend time in my kitchen, to write.

It was another great week for our CSA, however. No homemade preserves in this bundle, but a few welcome surprises, such as fingerling potatoes, hot peppers, and a big stalk of fresh garlic. If I can convince my partner to plant it instead of eat it, we might be able to start that garden sooner rather than later.

On a side note, but related to produce: It seems like everyone’s personal gardens are starting to burst with product. In the upcoming weeks I’d like to feature recipes that are of use to my gardening friends, so if you’ve got more zucchinis or tomatoes or basil etc than you can handle, drop me a comment and let me know what kind of recipes you’re in need of. If you just feel like getting rid of your produce, you can make sacrificial offerings at my address. We take all forms of vegetables, fruit, and cookies.

Now for this week’s yield!


Fresh basil

Potatoes!


More Swiss chard (coupled with last week’s bunch, look for this in our featured CSA recipe this week – just at the bottom of this article)


Radishes (more white bean, radish, and pea pod salad?)


Onions (uncured, so we were warned that they would go faster than store-bought. Not a problem, we’ve already used two out of three.)

As stated above, this past week didn’t exactly afford me a lot of kitchen time, but the CSA has been a significant help in not going hungry. Thanks to two straight weeks of Swiss chard and well-timed purchase of navy beans, I made an easy dinner for our post-family July 4th evening.

Beans and Greens

Ingredients
– 1 lb Swiss chard, kale, or spinach, or green of choice (the amount can vary, but a pound is recommended)
– 1 small onion, chopped
– 1 15 oz. can navy beans, drained and rinsed.
– 2 tsp garlic pepper
– 1 tsp dried basil
– 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

– Heat oil in medium-sized pot, then saute onions until tender. Throw in the greens (feel free to tear them into whatever size you desire), add the garlic pepper, and cook at low heat for five minutes.

– Once the greens are looking tender (but not completely soft), add the white beans and basil. Cover and cook at very low heat for up to twenty minutes.

Good Morning, Irish Stew!

I could talk about St. Patrick’s Day, but in regards to this stew, what I really want to briefly touch on is how fantastic Martha Stewart’s recipes are.

Look, I know she’s not a popular lady. She’ll never be thought of as warm and likeable and the gal everyone wants to be around. I can’t stand most of the folksy crafty stuff she does, I don’t care for a much of her line of interior decor, and I never have and never will watch her program. But the woman knows her recipes. Her cookbooks are some of the better name-branded cookbooks out there. Don’t know the first thing about basic kitchen skills? Check out Martha Stewart’s Cooking School and Martha Stewart’s Baking Handbook. Not only are the tips comprehensive, the instructions clearly written and simply broken down, but the instructive visuals are also top-notch. How do you fold something into a batter? What’s the correct way to whip something? What’s reduction and when is it appropriate?

These aren’t just great books for novices, however. Anyone from beginner to experienced cooks can utilize these resources. Although, being a little high-end for my tastes, I do not own them. (Yet.) What I do have is access to Martha Stewart online and its wondrous bounty of recipes and cooking tips. Chances are if you Google search for a recipe, you’ll pull up something from this website. They’re definitely worth a look.

In the past, I’ve made a few Martha recipes. Those Mini Almond Tarts were an adaptation of her Almond Tart recipe. This veganized version of her “Irish Beef and Stout Stew” is what I served up for St. Patrick’s Day, but it was so delicious, I’m ready to make another pot any day of the year.

Irish “Beef” and Guinness Stew

Ingredients
– About two pounds of beef-flavored seitan
– 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
– 2 tomato paste (6 oz.)
– 2 pounds new potatoes, peeled and chopped in large chunks
– 1 large onion, chopped
– 2 cups vegetable stock
– 1 bottle (12 oz) Guinness
– Several garlic cloves, thinly sliced (amount is to taste – I used six cloves)
– Salt and black pepper to taste
– 2 boxes frozen baby peas, thawed

– In a Dutch oven, saute the “beef” and onion in oil, then add the flour and tomato paste. Stir until well combined, then add potatoes, stock, beer, and garlic. Season generously with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, then cover, leaving to simmer for two hours. Check in frequently, stirring to prevent sticking.

– After two hours, stir in the peas, add more salt and pepper (if desired), and cover again, leaving to simmer for thirty minutes.

– Serve hot with soda bread and a cold pint of stout.

(Recipe adapted from “Irish Beef and Stout Stew” from Martha Stewart Online)

Good Morning, Vegan Pierogi!


Pierogi. Pierogie. Perogi. Pyrogi. Pyrohi. Doesn’t matter how you spell it, this staple of European cuisine satisfies hunger in a way few other dumplings can. What is it about the wondrous pierogi that makes it such a favorite? Could it be the thin dough, crispy and golden when fried? Could it be the filling, flavorful and bold against the neutral flavor of the dough? Could it be the handiness of the little savory pocket, or how easy they are to make, with cheap, accessible ingredients and easy preparation?

Given the cultural demographics of Pittsburgh, the pierogi is a staple of this city’s cuisine. Spend enough time on Urbanspoon, and you’ll find users more than ready to complain about this fact. Their point is not entirely ill-informed, but I think it comes from a place of overexposure, rather than a straight forward dislike of the dish itself. I don’t know the actual statistics, but I’d wager a bet that the majority of local restaurants ( those of unspecified ethnic cuisine, of course) offer pierogi. But don’t go judging a dish by its commonly mediocre preparation. Having pierogi on your menu because you’re expected to doesn’t exactly yield the best tasting versions. Many places are serving the same tired, frozen versions that you can buy in the supermarket. This is pierogi, sort of, but it’s about as satisfying as any frozen food can be.

What I say to these pierogi naysayers is to not hate on a dish until you’ve had it properly served to you, meaning homemade, either from some restaurant’s own kitchen or someone’s own home. Take a recommendation from those who LOVE the pierogi before ordering it at a random restaurant. Some good places to start:
S&D Polish Deli
Bloomfield Bridge Tavern
Rosie’s Pierogies
Gosia’s Pierogies (available at several locations, including the Pittsburgh Public Market)
St. John the Baptist Ukranian Catholic Church (they sell traditional Ukranian pyrohy starting in Fall and going until around the end of May)

Or you could eat some quality pierogi by getting into the action yourself. Making pierogi is easy, even if you have never made dumplings before. The dough can be kind of dry, making it tricky to knead and spread out the dough circles. I’ve been able to keep it workable by keeping my fingers wet. You want them to be damp enough to keep the dough from drying out, but not so wet as to make the dough slimy.

One of the best things about pierogi is how easy they are to make vegan. The dough itself can be made with butter, shortening, etc, but is usually best when it is made with simple vegetable oil. The filling is really up to the maker. For my Saturday evening vegan pierogi, I went with an easy potato and onion filling, that yielded far more than I needed. Darn, looks like I’m going to have to make another batch….

Everybody Polka for Some
Simple Vegan Pierogi!

Ingredients for filling:
– 2 medium potatoes, chopped (I used two larger than my fist and ended up with way more potato than I needed. So about fist sized should do it.)
– 1 medium onion, chopped
– 2 tsp garlic-pepper seasoning
– 1/2 tsp cayenne
– 1 tsp vegan margarine (I actually forgot to add this and the filling was still delicious, so it is optional)
– 1/2 cup of unsweetened non-dairy milk

Ingredients for dough:
– 1 cup all-purpose flour
– 1/4 cup water (and extra on hand, as needed)
– 1 1/2 tsp oil

For the filling: Boil the potatoes until tender. While potatoes are boiling, saute the onions until translucent, then set aside. Drain the water, add the onions (with the leftover oil), seasonings, margarine, and “milk” to the potatoes, and whip everything until smooth. You want to get it nice and creamy, so try to work out all the big lumps.

For the dough: Stir together flour, water, and oil until you get a workable dough. Knead for about three minutes, keeping your fingers wet to keep the dough from drying out. Divide the dough into eight equal chunks.

Assemble your pierogi: For each of the eight chunks of dough, roll into a ball and then flatten into a disk. The dough should be spread thin but sturdy enough to maintain without ripping. Take about tablespoon of the filling and place it into the center of the dough. Fold and pinch closed, then using the tines of a fork, seal the sides of the pierogi. Set each one aside until you have all completed.

Cook your pierogi: Boil a pot of water, then add the pierogi. Boil for about five minutes, or until each pierogi floats to the surface of the water. Scoop out and gently dry, then either freeze them for later use or cook them, either by frying (as I generally do, cause I love me some fresh fried pierogi) or baking in the oven.

Serve with vegan sour cream, a little smoked paprika, and fried onions, if desired. I know that’s how I like ’em.

(Recipe adapted from this recipe on Vegweb.com)