Tag Archives: cabbage

CSA #4 & Asian Slaw!

The third week of our CSA was the most adventurous yet, what with cauliflower, green kohlrabi, and a big bunch of bok choy. I’ll get to the eventual fate of the kohlrabi and bok choy in a minute, but first: CSA #4!

From left: kale, salad greens, brown rice.

Swiss chard, cabbage, broccoli

Green onions and radishes

There was a large patch of black raspberries growing, so one of the volunteers offered to make a batch of jarred preserves for the CSAs this week. We ate our way through it most of the weekend, smearing it on whatever neutral surface we could find. I tried to convince James to eat it with a spoon, but he had to draw the line somewhere.

Whatever.

Anyway, as to the fate of the green kohlrabi and bok choy, I was a little worried about spoiling if I held onto them past this week, so I made it one of my meal-planning objectives to figure out a good way to use them. A few of you had some really great suggestions. I especially loved the idea of making a nice vegetable stock with the bok choy, but with the summertime heat and the lack of open windows in my kitchen, it was a tad too warm for anything that needed to simmer for a long while on the stove top.

I was still riding on a cold salad high from last weekend, so I decided to take it a step further and experiment with a slaw based off of the bok choy, the kohlrabi, cabbage, and a big yellow bell pepper. Because I don’t have quite the right equipment to make a really shredded slaw, mine came out a bit chunky and extra crunchy. For a finer crunch, really shave down those veggies. A microplane works nicely – and I should get one, along with a knife-sharpening kit.

Summertime Asian Slaw

Ingredients
- 1/2 pound bok choy stalks, sliced down into thin strips
- 1/2 pound green kohlrabi, peeled and thinly sliced or shaved
- 1/2 pound green or purple cabbage, chopped and shredded
- 1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
- 1 tbsp brown sugar
- 2 tbsp soy sauce
- 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
- 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
- 1 tbsp canola oil
- 2 tsp powdered ginger

- In a large bowl, combine sugar, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, canola oil. Mix until well combined.

- Throw in veggies and toss in dressing. Add the ginger one teaspoon at a time. Mix until all ingredients are evenly coated. Allow to chill for an hour.

Stew! Stew! Stew! Part Two! Two! Two!

 
Andalusian Stew with Polenta from 30 Bucks a Week

I woke up and there was freaking snow on the ground. Seriously! On the ground, on the cars, on the rooftops. Snow! A fairly thin dusting, but still! That means only one thing: Time for more stew!

- The great 30 Bucks a Week blog linked to this New York Times recipe for Andalusian Cabbage Stew w/Polenta. The picture alone makes the article/recipe worth investigating, but it also further proves my theory that I don’t cook/eat cabbage nearly enough. Plus, this recipe gives me a good excuse to continue my experiments with polenta. Win/win!

- Kerry at Click and Cook has piqued both my stew and spice interest with her Indian Meatball Stew with Curried Cucumber Yogurt. A vibrantly colorful stew, I love how this mixes hot and cool flavors. Hmm, I wonder if it would work with lentil-balls…

- There are many dishes that I can’t really imagine as vegetarian or vegan, and Brunswick Stew is one of them. If you’re a meat-eater and are feeling like a ton of protein, check out a version of the recipe on Tales From Twisty Lane. Make sure to add the okra!

- Rock your roots! Dreamin’ It Vegan celebrates the last day of Vegan MoFo with the root vegetable extravaganza, Frosty Stew, a recipe borrowed from From Animal Crackers to Wild West Beans, a vegetarian cookbook focusing on recipes for the whole family, babies and children included. Ooh, and vegan peanut butter cookies too! These look especially delicious.

- Finally, thanks to Forever, Matryoshka because she reminded me of the terrific chopotle stew from Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s Vegan with a Vegeance. The Matryoshka blog version is Buccaroo Stew, and it’s definitely worth a hoot and a holler.

Stew! Stew! Stew!

Harvest Pumpkin Stew from VeganJoy

Oh boy oh boy! Do you feel that chill in the air? That bite in the wind? We’re in serious November weather territory now. It may get up to the fifties today and tomorrow, but it’s a steady decline into 40, even 30-degree temperatures. Soon that gray rain will be white snow. Makes me want to do a little dance of joy! And eat some stew!

I’ve had disagreements in the past on what distinguishes a stew from a soup. I tend to go with the Supreme Court-esque opinion, “I know it when I see it.” Or, rather, I know it when I taste it, cause looks can be deceiving. If pressed, I’d say that a stew should have about fifty percent less liquid than soup. Usually, you want a viscosity that is far thicker than your average soup broth, but not all stews are made the same. One man’s stew may be another man’s soup, but it’s not for us to judge. It’s (hopefully) for us to eat!

Enjoy your November rain a little more by trying out a few exceptional stew recipes:

- Nicole over at Cooking with Nicole tries out an Eggplant Stew from Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian. It actually reminds me a lot of the gypsy stew I make, but with eggplant and mushrooms and made much, much quicker. Love the shot of her veggies simmering. Makes me want curry and eggplant right. now.

- Seitan is my Motor offers a decent way to use a slowly aging head of cabbage by making a flavorful, almost-goulash Cabbage Stew. Looks amazing, and as served over rice, is guaranteed to be belly filling. Time I went out and got some cabbage.

- VeganJoy has given me an excellent idea for what to prepare for the upcoming Friendsgiving with this delicious and adorable looking Harvest Pumpkin Stew. A little involved, yes, but looks like it’s worth the time investment in sight and taste.

Chickpea and Green Bean Stew from Vegan Awakening

- Vegan Awakening serves up a perfect pantry-cleaning Chickpea and Green Bean Stew. I almost always have a can or two of chickpeas in the cupboard, as well as a bag of frozen green beans. This looks like a fantastic stew to whip on days too cold or rainy to leave the house for supplies.

- Finally, yes, a meaty stew. Mike teaches us how to make the Korean stew, Doenjang jjigae.  Yes, it also has tofu and veggies, but there’s more than enough beef in there to satisfy you meat-lovers. Plus, Mike recommends adding fish and poultry, so if you so desire, this can be a meat free for all.

Stew! Stew! Stew!

Oh, and yes, for musical entertainment and because it’s about as long as it takes to make a stew: